ASMR: AMAZING, OR WEIRD?

 

 

1 MIN READ

  Image: @talkingvs

"They're the fucking chills people, the chills." 
- some random on Urban Dictionary.

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ASMR stands for Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response. 

Generally, they're videos with close-range sounds that help some people relax by providing a tingling sensation down the head, neck and spine. Some call it an awesome head orgasm. Some call it really fucking weird. 

The most popular videos have sounds like whispering, tapping, cutting, or scrapping and visual cues like eye-gazing and slow hand movements. 

They are not intended to be sexual, OK? 

And, here are some celebrity ASMR videos for you.

Right so, why exactly do they give people tingles? 

Well, it hasn't been tested or proven yet, but one interesting hypothesis that makes sense to us, is that ASMR activates the biological pathways of inter-personal bonding and affiliative behaviours. For example, the parent and baby bond, family bond, friend bond, or romantic partner bond. 

"As long as these sounds are not abrupt, loud, or erratic then they may signal safety and comfort by informing us that a trusted individual is near, and this may be the reason they stimulate ASMR." 

I get it, I got a tingle and I understand the benefits, but I still can't seem to watch more than one minute. Why is this? 

It seems we all have different thresholds for stimuli to trigger these feelings. 

"Some individuals may only feel euphoria and comfort by snuggling with a loved one (strong stimulus), but never feel it by watching a video (weaker stimulus)." 

Whether they work for you, or you just think they're plain weird, they’re out there. About 13,200,000 videos of them to be precise. The popularity has grown in recent years probably due to the rise in stress levels, and because we can get and do nearly everything online now. 

That's it. [whispers] Bye.

Follow @ASMR 
or, @ifyouhigh for same-same but different

Read more about the hypothesis from Dr Craig Richard.

Written by Dee Behan

Read the full issue.

 
dee behan411, health, ASMRComment